Categories
BMW maintenance

Oilhead GS Spoke Wheel Tightening

OGSWTTv10

Categories
BMW maintenance

Oilhead Fork Seal Replacement

Replacing Fork Seal (oilhead)
I’ve busted another (it’s the 2.nd in 4 months) fork seal and I intend to replace it myself. I’ve searched the wisdom here and it looks simple. Just to make sure, can the wrench gods confirm the following steps:

a) With a 15 mm and a 19 mm loose the stanchion from the top triple clamp

b) once loose, the stanchion will move down inside the slider.

b) remove the plastic black band at the top of the stanchion.

c) unscrew the cup (is it a sort of dust seal ? is it screwn in?)

d) remove a retaining clip

e) pry the busted seal off. (anyone knows standard seal dimensions?)

f) Install new seal, reverse the rest of the operation

g) take front wheel and axle out, take air purge plug at top of stanchion out and drain fork leg at bottom drain plug.

h) fill 0.47 l of SAE 5 susp. oil.

Is it something like this or am I totally wrong? Why do these shites blow if there’s no susp internals inside? Are we supposed to purge the air regularly like on real forks?

TIA

 

jdiaz 10-07-2003 01:09 PM

Don’t remove the slider at all. Just remove the fork brace bolts, the axle, and the brake caliper, and the fork lower drops right onto the garage floor. At least, that’s how my memory remembers it. I do know that there is nothing positively attaching the slider to the lower fork leg.

The rest of your procedure sounds fine, although I wouldn’t even bother changing oil.

Jon

 

cj1150gs 10-07-2003 03:54 PM

1 Attachment(s)
John,

Thanks.

Sorry, it may be my english. I am calling stanchion to the inner fork tube (attached to the top triple clamp) and slider to the outer tube (attached to the bottom triple clamp / telelever arm).

So do I need to loosen the lower (outer) fork leg? I though that, by releasing the inner from the top triple clamp, this inner would move down inside the (outer) bottom fork leg, allowing me to take the seal out by the top part. Hum… maybe a drawing…

 

I just redid my left fork seal, and the upper (shiny part) of the left fork, today for the 2nd time since doing both in Achorage early this May, I tried to do it with out taking the entire fork out of the mounts. But it will save you time and knuck skin if you just take the bloody hold thing out. Rememer to re-aline the front axel before putting the tire back on. i tighten the bolts that #4 on preivioius pict. withthe axel in then put the tire back on.

as for replacing the fork seal. by taking the entire lower fork off you will have the ability to remove the bad seal easier. they are really tigith fit. also be very careful on putting the new one back in not ot damage the inner seal ring part of the seal. I used a large socket for to evenly get the seal to sit flat on the metal o-ring that goes below it. I had BMW Anchorage show me how to do it with their BMW speciality tool, I used a large socket that just fit into the lower fork section. If you have a friend with mechanic shop they should have a large enough socket. .

in addition, i put a bit of extra grease on the top cap to help keep dust getting into the seal and wearing it out quicker. To get old seal out is a pain and you need a L shaped hook type of tool to pull it out. that is why i take the lower section, so i can use my feet and legs to get a good hold on the fork to pull the seal out.

thing to check while doing seal replacement
take the tiem to clean out any grime in the bottom of the fork lower section, i use a little but of desiel fuel as a solvent and clean inner part of the fork of and grime fork oil that did not drain out.

the uper part of the fork (shiny part) will slide in easily if the seal is sitting flat on the lower metal o-ring. also take out the tiny hex bolt on the top of the upper part of the fork to let air in as you re-insert the lower part back onto the upper part. and then when everything is at the right place tighten the tiny screw back to seal the fork.

In addition, you should check you upper fork section to see if there are any fine scratches… i had some bad ones from all the dirt roads i ride in Colorado, that could be the reason you seals are wearing out so quickly. And buy a pair of fork covers.

Remove front wheel and brake callipers:

Loosen the inner top from the top triple clamp:

Loosen the pinch bolts on the bottom triple clamp:

Lower the fork tube in the lower triple clamp, let the cup(dust seal ) rest agaisnt it and push down to extract the dust seal.

how it looks once out:

Now remove the air purging little bolt from the top of the inner tube. Then pull the inner from inside the outer. Beware oil spillage!

Now remove circlip:

Then pry the seal out with a big flat blade screwdriver. Protect the top of the outer tube with some plastic piece or something:


Bellow the seal there’s a large washer (rusty in my case):

Where it all seats (once cleaned):

All in pieces:


Now, when I took the inner from the outer I saw that the seal didn’t have any visible damage. The inner is also in good aparent shape without scratches… humm.. I begin to suspect crash is right. Let’s put the inners in the truing stand:

Shit. Crash is Right. About both inner tubes.


I didn’t have my feeler gauges handy. But I had a book 1 cm thick and a 100 pages :): . I can slip 2 pages but not three bellow the middle of the inner. So I guess it has a runnout of 2 to 3/10 mm. Is this acceptable? I can turn the inners inside the outers with no effort…

The Telelever A-arm looks OK. (Apart from the fact that it hits the Hepcko & Becker crash bars :splat.

I can’t see the dreaded cracks in the paint.


The grease under the dust cup is common practice on dirt bikes (real ones, that is). But the manual of my KTM says to put new grease in every 15 riding hours! So, I guess it is a good thing to do if we do ride off-road, but it should be at least inspected on a regular basis (like monthly?)

I borrowed a friend’s micrometer and built a pennytech measuring stand:

As expected, the tubes are more or less inside spec (0.016″)regarding runout. (one is at 0.015″ and the other at 0.018″).

Well then why does the shop manual say to do so?

BMW Shop Manual Page 31.9]
• Install fixed tube.
• Install washer (6).
• Push the lightly oiled shaft sealing ring fully up to
the stop on the slider tube, then press home by
tapping lightly and using threaded bush,
BMW No. 31 5 611, expander,
BMW No. 31 5 612, and reducing adapter,
BMW No. 31 5 613.
• Install retaining ring and dust wiper.
• Insert bleed screw (1).
• Bleed telescopic forks under zero load.

Categories
BMW maintenance

Oilhead Maintenance

OilheadMaintenance

Categories
BMW maintenance

Oilhead Starter Mod

Retrofitting Jump Starting Post to Oilheads

Hi everyone.

I just added a positive battery jumper post to my 1999 R1100S. I wrote up a brief “how to” for the R1100S board, but those of you with pre-2004 GS’s or other R bikes might find this useful as I suspect the process is nearly identical on all oilheads. It’s an easy mod and looks factory when you’re done (see last picture in this post).

The BMW parts you need (at least for the R1100S – other threads have listed parts for the GS – they may be the same) are as follows:

(7) 61137671355 Bracket
(8) 61137671354 Screw
(9) 61137672395 Protective Cap
(10) 07119931050 Washer

I don’t recall how much these cost as I got them a while back, maybe $25 or so. Here’s what the new parts look like:

Here’s the process:

1. IMPORTANT: Disconnect the ground wire on the battery. I know, I know, this probably means removing bodywork to get access to the battery, but this is really not something to fool around with. You’re going to be disconnecting a big wire that is ALWAYS hot and unfused, even with the ignition off. (Perhaps do like I did and make this mod when you need to get under the tank for other things.)

2. Remove the allen bolt holding the starter cover on and remove the starter cover. The bolt is a bit hard to fish out – it’s at the rearward end of the cover pointing forward. A small allen wrench and little hands work best. After removing the bolt, iIt helps to push the gear shift lever down to fish the cover out.

3. The stater relay is at the top with the starter motor below. The new jumper post is going to attach to the top terminal of the relay which is wired directly to the battery with heavy gauge wiring. Unscrew the hex nut on the top terminal and push wire aside. Again, if you previously disconnected the battery ground, this wire can touch things without consequence, but if you didn’t it’s “hot” and will spark like crazy if it touches any ground.

There is a small clip that is inside the wire terminal on the top terminal post – you’re going to be replacing this clip with the new bracket piece onto which the post will mount. The bracket has a shape that mimics the shape of the clip. (Gotta love German over-engineering.)

4. Put the wire terminal back on the post and tighten down the hex nut. At this point, you’ve got a nice bracket ready to receive the jumper post through the starter motor cover.

5. All that’s left is to drill a hole for the post in the starter motor cover. I measured, crossed my fingers, drilled a small pilot hole, saw how close I was, and then made a minor correction as I enlarged the hole. Or you might put something in the bracket that would mark the back of the cover when you test fit it. If you want to use my measurements, the hole is 12mm in diameter, and the center is 123mm and 26mm from the left/top edges of the cover. A step drill is ideal for drilling a nice hole.

6. Put the starter cover back on, screw the post in the bracket, and put the protective cap over the post. You’re done.

Categories
BMW maintenance

Oilhead Timing the easy way

Timing Adjustment – No Tools Needed
Well ok, not really no tools, but only two wrenches.

NO electronic tools needed, and NO electrical knowledge.

AND no need to remove the fuel tank.

Setting the timing uses a ‘feature’ of the 1150 Motronic ECU. It works on ’01 and ’02. But I do not know how widespread the ‘feature’ is across other model years.

Here’s the deal. You know how the crank pulley trips the hall-effect sensors right?

Well, if the ignition key is on, and the crank is turned slowly by hand, at the moment the crank pulley trips the hall-effect sensor, the Motronic will switch the fuel pump on for a moment.

Roughly the process is:

Ignition key off
Unplug the headlight
Remove the flywheel viewing plug in the bell housing
Remove the alternator belt cover
Rotate the crank by hand to the ‘ S ‘ flywheel mark
Turn the ignition key on – the fuel pump will cycle normally
Rotate the crank very s-l-o-w-l-y by hand until the fuel pump cycles again
(approx 5° of crank rotation)
The crank is now at the hall sensor trip point
Look at the flywheel marking to see where the timing is set
Adjust if necessary

Pictures and details to follow.

– Jim

 

Poolside 05-11-2005 03:07 PM

———————————-
Tools needed

———————————-
Turn the ignition off.

Reach up under the instrument panel and unplug the headlight. This step is optional, at your discretion. I prefer to unplug the headlight. If a timing adjustment is performed, the ignition key will be on a while.

———————————-
Remove the black plastic front engine cover. Behind the cover are the crankshaft pulley, hall effect sensor adjustment, and alternator belt tension adjustment.

TIP: If an aftermarket shock is fitted, the shock may be too close to the front cover. If so, the lower mounting bolt may be removed to tilt the shock out of the way of the front cover. If a stock shock is fitted, there is enough clearance to remove the front cover.

IMPORTANT: Think about this. If removing the lower mounting bolt of the front shock, be sure the rear of the bike is weighted so that the bike will not tip forward. And, it helps to have another person to lift up on the front wheel to remove the shear load from the shock bolt.

After the front engine cover is removed, replace the shock bolt for safety.

———————————-
Rotate the crank until you see the ‘ S ‘ flywheel mark in the bell housing hole. For clarity, this picture is staged with the technician on the left side of the bike. You may find it easier to do this from the right hand side of the bike.

———————————-
Rotate the crank until you see the ‘ S ‘ flywheel mark. The ‘ S ‘ mark is 5� Before Top Dead Center (BTDC).

———————————-
Turn the ignition key on. The fuel pump will cycle normally. And if you unplugged the headlight, the headlight will not be on.

S-L-O-W-L-Y rotate the crank. After about 5� of rotation the fuel pump will cycle again.

You can see that 5� is not very far. If you ‘feel’ that you over-rotated the crank by some amount, just reverse the crank 5 degrees and try again. This is a light-handed maneuver.

———————————-
Take a look at the flywheel mark again. If the timing is correct, the ‘ OT ‘ mark will be lined up in the center of the viewing hole. The ‘ OT ‘ mark is Top Dead Center (TDC).

———————————-
Ok. Repeat the last two steps a few times. The fuel pump will cycle each time the crank pulley crosses the sensor trip point.

Each time the fuel pump cycles, stop and look at the location of the flywheel mark. Slowly repeat the process of crossing the sensor trip point, and checking the flywheel mark. After some number of tries, the final location of the mark will be consistent.

The flywheel mark will be in one of three places. Exactly on TDC, somewhat ahead of TDC, or somewhat behind TDC.

PARALLAX ERROR: It is easy enough to position your eye exactly centered above the bell housing hole. The hole in the bell housing has side walls or ‘draft’. And it is easy to spot whether your perspective is lined up.

From a look at the pictures below, it is possible to determine that the camera lens is not lined up with the centerline of the hole. The camera lens is a little above the hole centerline.

What gives the high lens location away is the ‘draft’ visible along the bottom edge of the hole. Eyes will see the same thing if their perspective is a little above the hole centerline. Get your reading glasses, and a good light.

When your eye is lined up with the hole, it is natural to draw an imaginary line through the center of the circle. Take a look at the green line, is very natural to see where the ‘ OT ‘ mark is, relative to that imaginary green line.

———————————-
Spark advance looks like this. Some amount ahead of TDC.

For example, this is what 2� advance looks like.

———————————-
Spark retard looks like this. Some amount behind TDC.

For example, this is what 2� retard looks like.

———————————-
The hall sensors are hidden from view. They are behind the crank pulley. The hall sensors are mounted to a circular plate. The circular plate can be seen around the perimeter of the crank pulley.

Spark timing is controlled by the hall sensors. Spark timing adjustment is done by changing the position of the hall sensors, relative to the crank pulley. Changing the position of the hall sensors is done by adjusting the circular plate.

The timing adjustment range is limited to about �5�. And about the middle of the adjustment range sets the timing to about TDC.

———————————-
Loosen the THREE hex head fasteners that hold the circular hall sensor plate. Fully loosen the fasteners so that the circular sensor plate will slide freely.

People have reported that the plate on their bike was stuck in place or almost impossible to turn. If that is the case the fasteners can be removed fully and the plate can be freed by lifting it away from the surface. Some canned air and spray lube should remove any grit or debris, and keep the plate moving freely when loosened next time.

It is much easier to make small adjustments to the plate if the fasteners are very loose. If the fasteners are even slightly snug, too much force must be applied to the plate to move it. And when it does move it will overshoot the intended mark.

———————————-
PAUSE: This just seemed worth stopping for. I did not really notice until working with these pictures. This is the UNDERSIDE of the front control arm. I am glad my friend lets me use his bike for these photos. My hands (and the camera) stay clean.

———————————-
Adjusting the timing.

First, turn off the ignition key.

The timing is adjusted by moving the hall sensor plate. The full range of adjustment is limited to about �5�. The sensor plate can be moved to either end of the 10� range and the engine will start and the bike is plenty rideable.

Make a pencil mark across the plate and front cover and experiment. I am running mine at about 3� advance timing. The idle is smoother and the pinging is about the same. Though as the weather gets warmer the engine may ping less at 0� timing.

To advance the timing, move the bottom of the hall sensor plate to the right. A small flat blade screwdriver is used to slide the plate.

———————————-
To retard the timing, move the bottom of the hall sensor plate to the left.

———————————-
After moving the hall sensor plate where you wish, snug one of the fasteners to hold it in place.

Turn on the ignition key and repeat the previous steps of rotating the crank pulley until the fuel pump cycles. And check to see how the timing changed.

———————————-
After all of this smooth sailing, there is one pesky gotcha here. When reattaching the plastic cover, it can sometimes be impossible to get the screws on the left side of the cover started.

Here is why. The oil return tube has two brackets that are held in place with two of the front cover screws. You can see the problem you will have if the brackets are not lined up with the screw holes.

Categories
BMW maintenance

OREPAD

Oilhead Rocker Endplay Adjustment For The R259 Engine

OREPADv1.0

Categories
BMW maintenance

OVAD

Oilhead Valve Adjustment for Dummies

OVADv2.2

Categories
BMW maintenance

DIY Motorcycle tools

    1. Can I be your buddy?

    2. vtwin

      vtwinAir cooled runnin’ mon

      Joined:
      Jan 11, 2005
      Oddometer:
      9,656
      Location:
      NorCal

      Clutch spring tool.

      [​IMG]

      [​IMG]

      [​IMG]

      :rofl

    3. thump_co

      thump_co..ouch

      Joined:
      Feb 23, 2011
      Oddometer:
      2,530
      Location:
      8532′

      Not so much “made”, as improvised, but got ‘er done.

      [​IMG]

    4. jad3675

      jad3675Been here awhile

      Joined:
      Jan 3, 2008
      Oddometer:
      144
      Location:
      Cincinnati, Ohio

      One HF bar clamp plus a 3-way edge clamp and you have a one person fork spring compressor.

      [​IMG]

      John

    5. EmBeeZedEx

      EmBeeZedExBeen here awhile

      Joined:
      Jul 28, 2014
      Oddometer:
      140
      Location:
      Seatown, PNWet

      [​IMG]

      O2 sensor socket and a C-clamp. The shiny parts on the socket are where I polished it a bit on the sander and buffer. If I hadn’t then those shiny parts would instead likely be aluminum scraped out of the lifter bore.

    6. Desert Skies

      Desert SkiesOne brick shy…

      Joined:
      Mar 2, 2004
      Oddometer:
      2,586
      Location:
      Tejas

      I’m a cheap bastige so I make a lot of tools and fixtures. Here are a couple.

      R1200 filter wrench.

      [​IMG]

      [​IMG]

      Wheel balancer…

      [​IMG]

      [​IMG]

      Wheel flange puller and high tech heat shield.

      [​IMG]

      U-joint alignment press.

      [​IMG]

      [​IMG]

  1. thump_co

    thump_co..ouch

    Joined:
    Feb 23, 2011
    Oddometer:
    2,530
    Location:
    8532′

    Nice! This thread is awesome.

  2. kyrbz

    kyrbzAdventurer

    Joined:
    Feb 12, 2015
    Oddometer:
    33
    Location:
    US – Midwest

    Needed to make an odd sized M20.5 x 1.25 puller for a 1951 Aermacchi I was working on.

    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]

  3. GS Addict

    GS AddictPepperfoolSupporter

    Joined:
    Sep 24, 2006
    Oddometer:
    7,349
    Location:
    Sunshine Coast B.C.

    Oilhead valve spring compression tool
    [​IMG]

    Paralever bearing cup removal/install tool
    [​IMG]

    Spark plug tool (extension is permanently affixed)
    [​IMG]

    Wheel balancing tool
    [​IMG]

    3,4,5 bolt BMW rear wheel balance adapter
    [​IMG]

Categories
BMW maintenance

Paralever tool

Paralever Thrust Bearing Adjustment.

Just finished doing this job today and saw this thread. Apologies if it’s been covered but a search didn’t throw it up!

A couple of weeks back, when cleaning the bike (04 GSA) I did the usual check of the rear wheel play and found that there was a definate movement both top and bottom and side to side.

Research showed that this was likely to be caused by the Paralever thrust bearings needing some adjustment.

This one…..

The adjuster is the 12mm hex nut in the centre, the 30mm outer is a lock-nut.

The adjuster is torqued to 7Nm the lock-nut to 160Nm. Both are liberally coated in a thread-lock compound on assembly and needs to be heated to 100 deg C to soften the compound before attempting to loosen them.

Cut the tie on the forward end of the gaiter and peel it to the rear to avoid damaging it and then heat the lock-nut with a hot-air gun until the thread-lock softens.

Use a suitable breaker bar to undo the lock-nut.

Clean the lock-nut and the adjuster to get rid of the old thread-lock compound. I used acetone.

Holding the adjuster at an angle and pouring some acetone into the top of the lock-nut…

then turning the lock-nut down

is a quick way of cleaning both threads.

Clean the Paralever thread too. Acetone and a wooden cocktail stick works well.

There is a BMW Special Tool that enables you to hold the adjuster while torquing-up the lock-nut.

Basically it’s a 30mm socket with a section cut out and a 12mm hex-key.

I bought a 30mm impact socket for �8 (about $12 I think) and got a machine shop to grind out a slot.

To re-assemble you will need something like the above to hold the adjuster at it’s low 7Nm torque value while you put 160Nm into the lock-nut.

Put a jack under the Paralever arm to prevent it moving while you swing on the wrench.

It also helps to line up the thrust bearing.

Coat the adjuster with thread-lock and start it off by hand. Then swap to a small torque wrench and use that to tighten it to the 7Nm value (not very much!).

At this point I used an indelible pen to mark a vertical line on the adjuster so that I could instantly see if the adjuster moved much while tightening the lock-nut.

Put the 12mm hex-key into the adjuster and then tighten the lock-nut with a ring-spanner (wrench) as much as you can while holding the hex-key steady – preventing the adjuster from turning with the lock-nut.

Then insert the hex-key into the ‘special tool’ and again use the hex-key to hold the adjuster while tightening the lock-nut to 160Nm.

Replace the rear wheel and check for play. I checked that the pen line remained vertical before a little acetone removed the mark.

Hey-presto! No play in the rear wheel. (As I was doing this and a two-year service, I also removed the rear drive cover and checked the crown-wheel bearings just to be on the safe side. All it cost me was the price of an ‘O’ ring and an oil seal but gave me peace of mind).

If you want to see the BMW Special Tool and some rough dimensions for making your own, here goes.

Categories
BMW maintenance

Reducing buffeting BMW GS

Reducing Buffeting and/or Improving Noise, Wind, and Weather Protection on a BMW R1100GS or a R1150GS

 

http://www.advrider.com/ – April 2002

 

Many BMW R11GS riders find the performance of the factory windscreen unsatisfactory.  Several replacement windscreens exist and are presented here.

 

Before selecting a replacement windscreen, there are some factors and products that may be worth exploring prior to replacing or modifying a windscreen:

 

Helmet

Fit and construction can reduce wind noise.  Some designs are less susceptible to buffeting than others.

 

Tank Panniers

Tank panniers have been reported to reduce buffeting by affecting wind flow beneath the windscreen.

 

Saeng Stealth Edging™

Stealth Edging™ has been reported by some to help.

 

Windscreen Wings/Spoilers

Wings and spoilers such as the Saeng Winglets™, Touratech Windscreen spoiler R1150GS, or Boxer Design Draft Deflector can be used to “tune” wind flow.

 

Seat Height

Adjusting the seat height can occasionally change your forward profile sufficiently to be effective.

 

Factory Windscreen

The angle of the factory windscreen can be adjusted and it can be removed.  Other adjustments that have been attempted include cutting down the factory windscreen and modifications allowing sharper windscreen angles.

 

Protecting a Windscreen

Many windscreens may be too big or fragile for heavy off-road use.

 

Since the GS has a full swing steering column with wide handlebars, some handlebar protectors (BMW, Acerbee, Touratech) extend out far enough that they actually hit the screen when at an extreme position. Under normal circumstances the handlebars will not move this much however a crash result in a broken a windscreen or worse.   A fork stop such as the Toutatech unit can prevent this and possibly a broken steering lock.

 

Member comments are subjective and may represent a small sample of those using a product.  Attempts were made to include representative opposing comments.  Product costs are typically MSRP.

 

If you find a solution your interested in and are looking for additional information, please search the forum prior to posting a query.  Additional information can also be found at MicaPeak.

 

A list of BMW accessory dealers and other valuable information can be found at webBikeWorld.

 

AeroFlow – R1100GS and R1150GS Half Fairing

 

Often considered the most effective windscreen available.  Costly and many find it ugly.

 

Physical

R1100GS

Standard: 6 1/2″ taller than factory stock.

Tall: 9-1/2″ taller than factory stock.

Measured vertically from the front of gas filler cap.

R1150GS

Standard: 17-7/8″ taller than factory stock.

Tall: 20-5/16″ taller than factory stock.

Measured vertically from the front of gas filler cap.

 

Options

Clear, Smoke

Standard, Tall

AeroGards – AeroGards are designed to direct air away from the legs and torso and help maintain the integrity of the fairing’s envelope of protection. Available in Clear or Smoke.

 

Cost

$425.00 U.S.

 

Web Site

http://www.aeroflowscreens.com/

 

 
Member Feedback
Member Height Inseam Comments
Killen 6’ 3”   “…but it works. I’m 6’3″ and solved the turbulance and noise problem the hard way. First I didn’t know about this site so I was on my own. I bought the 22″ Parabellum and loved the clarity but it did not resolve the turbulance. So I went to the Aeroflow and solved the problem(s). The Aeroflow also allows you to mount your aux lights on the hardware.”
cmunger     “I have two GSs. One has a Parrabellum and the other an Air Flow. Like the AF because it keeps a good deal of wind off me and can hang the PIAA running lights from the frame. Like the Pb because it is large enough to keep a lot of wind off me and yet minimalist enough to allow more air from the bottom side. Have to use a light bar to hang the PIAAs on though. Put 20k on each unit and prefer the Pb in the summer and the AF in the winter. Seasonal comfort is what I’m looking for if possible. AF is harder to clean because of it being two-piece.”

 

 

 

Givi – Spare Screens D 233S (R1150GS) and D 231S (R1100GS)

 

Mounting is straight forward using the original hardware.  Also adjustable like the factory windscreen.

 

Physical

D 231S (R1100GS)

Height: Unknown – presumed to be the same as D 233S.

Width: Unknown – presumed to be the same as D 233S.

D 233S (R1150GS)

Height: 4.7 “ taller than the factory windscreen.

Width: 6.3 “ wider than the factory windscreen.

 

Options

None

 

Cost

$120.00 U.S.

 

Web Site

http://www.givi.it/

 

 
Member Feedback
Member Height Inseam Comments
drholm 6’ 6” 36” “I spent the better part of one morning with the Givi in every position and the only change was at what speed it became unbearable. I’m 6’6″ and I run the seat at the high position to generate a little more leg room. I have thought about pulling the screen entirely and when I stand on the pegs everything smooths out.”
moon     “my Givi works well enough for me. I’m mostly concerned about keeping the wind from blowing my head back. If my arms and shoulders get hit with wind, so what.”
Marc 6’ 6”   “Position 1 (lowest). Smoooooth air flow at low and medium speeds. Feels great. It’s about 80 deg. F here and life is good. I did notice that the Acerbis hand shield on the right side contacts the windshield when full-lock left. About 75 MPH, you start to get some buffeting.

Position 2 (middle). Airflow isn’t as smooth as Position 1 at low and middle speeds, but above 70 MPH, it’s way smoother. No contact problems with bars or front cover.

Position 3 (highest). Feels like you’re riding in dead air up to about 50. Wow. However, at speeds greater than 60, I started to feel significant buffeting. Above 80 MPH, I felt like someone was kicking my head! When I stopped, I noticed that the leading (lowest) edge of the windscreen was contacting the front instrument cover and ackchooly wore off some paint! Hmmmm….”

 

 

 

Parabellum – R1150GS Sport Shield and R1100GS Sport Shield

 

Sport Shields are one-piece clear (or tint) fairings.. Lightweight, easy bolt-on installation (and quick to remove or reinstall — 4 bolts). Sport Shields are available in low, medium, and tall sizes. Material used is 3/16″ thick ICI (Dupont) Lucite “L”. This hard, non-yellowing material is optically clear with a 92% light transmission index (versus 67% for most (Lexan) BMW windshields).

 

Physical

R1100GS

Height:

Low Model – 19”

Medium Model – 20”

Tall Model – 21”

R1150GS

Height:

Low Model – 18”

Medium Model – 20”

Tall Model – 22”

 

Options

Clear or Tinted

 

Cost

$230.00 U.S. or $240.00 U.S. Tinted

 

Web Site

http://www.parabellum.com/

 

 
Member Feedback
Member Height Inseam Comments
Killen 6’ 3”   “…I’m 6’3″ and initially bought a Parabellum (22″) that didn’t do the job…”
frisbee      “just traded the Wunderlich (which did not do much) to a more comfortable parabellum 23 inches high. Its a little like being in a fishbowl but good protection.”
John Fallon 6’   “Tried the Parabellum, below 60MPH fine. above that weird wind vibration on the top of the helmet. Parabellum is real good about returns.”
Mario 6’ 2”   “I am 6′ 2″ and bought the tall Parabellum. I noticed a really goofy thumping on the top of my head when going over 70.  I also noticed that the windshield bends a bit when going at higher speeds, about an 1″.  This could be due to more force on the front suspension, but I doubt it.  I am also thinking about cutting some holes for the handle bars because I can see that windshield getting busted when I go down.  My assessment is that you should switch to the stock windshield when you are offroading and use the parabellum when cruising.  It is pretty easy to switch.”

 

Wunderlich – Ermax (R1150GS)

 

 

Physical

Height: 3.9” taller than the factory windscreen.

 

Options

None

 

Cost

$120.00 U.S.

 

Web Site

http://www.wunderlich.de/

http://www.wunderlich.co.uk/

 

 
Member Feedback
Member Height Inseam Comments
fish 6’ 0”   “I compared the Wunderlich “Ermax” screen with the Givi, and they provide equivalent protection. Givi is half the price and has much better quality of material and workmanship.”

 

Wunderlich – Ermax (R1100GS)

 

A two-tone windshield, the “smoky” top half provides subtle sun protection and the opaque bottom half shades instruments from glare.

 

Physical

Height: 3.9” taller than the factory windscreen.

 

Options

None

 

Cost

$135.00 U.S.

 

Web Site

http://www.wunderlich.de/ (German)

http://www.wunderlich.co.uk/

 

 
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Wunderlich – Tall Touring Screen (R1150GS)

 

 

 

Physical

Height:

 

Options

None

 

Cost

$160.00 U.S.

 

Web Site

http://www.wunderlich.de/

http://www.wunderlich.co.uk/

 

 
Member Feedback
Member Height Inseam Comments
City Slicker 6’ 2” 32” “The wind from the side is much reduced, noise is much lower, 90mph riding is more comfortable.”

 

MRA – Varioscreen (R1150GS)

 

MRA indicates that this windscreen is not available in the U.S. and Canada due to liability issues.  What is believed to be the same windscreen is available in the U.S. from BMW of Santa Cruz County as a Wunderlich Ermax “2 Piece” windscreen. This windscreen cannot be found on the Wunderlich websites.

 

Physical

Height: Adjustable

 

Options

None

 

Cost

$200.00 U.S.

 

Web Site

http://www.mra.de/

http://www.bmwscruz.com/

 

 
Member Feedback
Member Height Inseam Comments
fish 6’ 0”   “Seems to work really well, assuming your criteria is low noise and turbulence. If you want the wind off you too, you’ll need to go to a popemobile This is going to be a terrific summer screen…lots of air passing through…all the vents on the Arai get full air. Yeah baby, that’s what I’m talking about . No more feeling like I’m in a boxing match at 90mph! Make sure you get the little thumbscrews for $8 so you can adjust the screen on the fly.”
City Slicker 6’ 2” 32” “In its highest setting, the Vario screen looked and felt fragile and I had reports in advance that it was prone to vibration at higher speeds. I ruled it out when I saw it in the flesh – thin top screen and shabbily moulded plastic fittings that didn’t seem to fit.”
Flying Dutchman 6’ 3” 34” “…I remember the stock screen tunneled the turbulence layer (the boundary between the smooth laminar high speed air and the still air behind the screen) directly in my eyes. The width of this envelop was between both middles of my upper arms. The MDI shifted this boundary layer up a little bit, just above my eyes. Width was equal. The MRA seems to bring the turbulence boundary to the very top of my helmet, the width has increased sligthly towards my elbows. So this means a little less gorrila arms and helmet lift-off at speeds over 140 km/h. I think my average cruising speed will now settle around 150-160 instead of 130-140 km/h. The roar of this turbulent layer hitting my helmet is noticably smoother, although not very significant. It seems much more bareable, but you of course still need earplugs to prevent permanent hearing damage (hell, you even need that on a Goldwinnabago..). Given the endless angle and length setups on this screen and the relative low price, you’ll always find a setup that suits you. The upper screen has 3 holes to which you can attach the slider, which in itself can be slided relatively simple up and down along the lower screen. Even with the screen at a steep up angle, there still is a lot of room left for air to travel underneath the screen to reduce turbulence.”
cRAsH     “Head-slap turbulence was way down, noise still high. Looks bitchin’ cool  — would never put one my bike because I would break it. The slider hardware is somewhat cheesy.”
drholm 6’ 6” 36” “The only setting that is a worthwhile improvement over stock is full forward, full raised. The turbulent air is moved to just at the very top of my helmet. There is still a lot of air coming around the sides of the screen and around the tank. At 90 mph + everything smoothed out nicely. I think it’s a keeper. Better than the GIVI by quite a lot. Probably not as good as the Aeroflow, especially with the Aero-guards to deflect some of the air coming around the screen . The plex is not as thick as stock but far from flimsy. The screen adjusters have rubber/steel washers and knurled knobs. They snug it up tight. It did not vibrate at high speed. There is more flex than the stock screen but this does not seem to be a problem as far as I can tell. I’ll watch it carefully for signs of stress cracking and report back. I think it would survive a typical offroad drop with no problem.”

 

BMW – R1150GSA Windscreen

 

The factory windscreen for the R1150GSA is non-adjustable this windscreen but is larger, wider and has different contours than the factory R1150GS windscreen. 

 

Physical

Height:

 

Options

None

 

Cost

$170.00 U.S.

 

Web Site

http://www.bmwmotorcycles.com/

 

 
Member Feedback
Member Height Inseam Comments
hutchman 6’ 8”   “At 6′ 8″ the wind hits me in the middle of my chest. I’m going to install a tall Aeroflow. They really seem to work.”
envi 5’ 9” 32” “I have a ADV/GS with almost 600 mi,I think the ADV wind screeen is better by far”
stevekat     “Coming from an Aeroflow on my 1998 R1100GS, the Adventure screen is worthless. I am 6′ and 32′ inseam. If I were 4″ shorter on the upside it might work OK. Good thing thing we are typing, because I am deaf having rode the bike 600 miles home from the dealer; I wouldn’t be able to hear the question if it were spoken because my eardrums were blown out. I am finding an Aeroflow ASAP.”

 

MDI – Vervangingsruitje

 

 

Physical

Height: 3.15 “ taller than the factory windscreen.

 

Options

Clear and eight tints are available.

R1100GS is available with and without a “flip-up” lip at the top of the windscreen.

The R1150GS windscreen is available only with a flip-up lip.

 

Cost

$80.00 – $90.00 U.S.

 

Web Site

http://www.mdi-motorcycle-equipment.nl/

 

 
Member Feedback
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Touratech – “DESIERTO” Fairing (R1100GS)

 

A cockpit fairing that includes: DE Projector headlights and Tinted screen.  Original instruments can be retained.

 

Can be used with original fuel tank or the Touratech 41 litre tank. Fairing comes unpainted. Installation does not require any major modifications of the bike..

 

Physical

Height:

 

Options

There is a headlight cover available for the ‘DESIERTO’ twin headlights. Devised for off-road riding, it is made from rugged MACROLON and protects the headlights against damage from flying stones. (The headlight cover does not come with a German TÜV Type Approval – is not street legal in Germany.)

 

A Rallye version of this cockpit exists which allows for easy mounting of an IMO computer, roadbook and control lamps. It has been prepared to accommodate both the IMO computer and the roadbook.

The cockpit is made from CNC machined aluminium and has a black plastic coating. Micro switches have already been integrated. ABS control lamps are also fitted.  Cost is $821.00 U.S.

 

Cost

$758.00 U.S.

 

Web Site

http://www.touratech.com/

 

 
Member Feedback
Member Height Inseam Comments
       
       

 

Touratech – “DESIERTO II” Fairing (R1150GS)

 

A cockpit fairing made from GFK.  Includes tinted screen and mini indicators.  Original headlights and instruments are retained. Works with the original fuel tank or the Touratech 41 litre tank.  No vehicle modifications necessary. Unpainted fibreglas gelcoat

 

Physical

Height:

 

Options

Models are available to support various combinations of IMO, Roadbooks, control lamp kits, and/or

Nav-Assistants.

 

Cost

$599.00 U.S.

 

Web Site

http://www.touratech.com/

 

 
Member Feedback
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Witec – X-TREM Shield X01 Fiberglass

 

The Witec X-treme shield mounts in place of the aluminum plate behind the windshield and is 13 cm (5-1/4″) taller than the part it replaces. This shield requires painting for a finished look.

 

Physical

Height:

 

Options

An unlacquered version is available.

 

Cost

$179.00 U.S.

 

Web Site

http://www.witec-motorsport.de/

 

 
Member Feedback
Member Height Inseam Comments
Will     “…On a 1-10 scale I’d give it an 8 for fit but a 4 for quality. the under side is unfinished fiberglass, the top is grey primer. Turbulance is gone, noise is up, no better or worse than without the windshield but with the stock grey shield.”
       

 

Witec – X-trem Shield X02 Fiberglass

 

 

Physical

Height:

 

Options

An unlacquered version is available.

 

Cost

$227.00 U.S.

 

Web Site

http://www.witec-motorsport.de/

 

 
Member Feedback
Member Height Inseam Comments
       
       

 

Boxer Design – Short carbon cockpit windshield (R1100GS)

 

 

Physical

Height:

 

Options

None

 

Cost

$167.00 U.S.

 

Web Site

http://www.boxer-design.de/

 

 
Member Feedback
Member Height Inseam Comments
       
       

 

Boxer Design – Carbon or plastic windshield (R1150GS)

 

Physical

Height:

 

Options

Available in carbon or plastic with your choice of colour coating.

 

Cost

$158.00 U.S.

 

Web Site

http://www.boxer-design.de/