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Are tire inserts the future in gravel driving?

Tire inserts are steadily gaining followers in mountain biking, and as they become more widespread, brands are starting to offer insoles specifically for gravel and cyclocross. What are tire inserts and why are they needed for thin tires? What can you do that more tire volume cannot? Well there are a couple of advantages.

Camping site installation of a Tannus mountain bike insert during the drier months

What are tire inserts?

Let’s start with the first question. What are tire inserts? There are several very different designs, but they all share the same basic idea. Something solid that will fit in a tire, usually tubeless tires instead of just air. Inserts can help protect the rim and protect the tire casing itself.

Where did the idea come from? Mountain bikers have adopted and adapted the idea of ​​off-road motorcycles. With the Moto, a solid rubber foam insert – known as a “mousse” or “bib mousse” – fills the entire inside of the tire instead of air.

With bicycles, there are a few factors that make airless options impractical. First, riders have to propel their own motion, making the weight of a solid insert an obvious disadvantage. Bicycles also use a wide range of tire pressures that must change based on conditions. Instead of a solid liner, most bike options use some type of partial liner combined with air and usually tubeless tire sealant. Inserts vary widely in design, and this is where things get interesting. Each design has its own advantages and disadvantages.

The idea first found its feet in mountain biking, where tubeless tires are widespread and weight is less important. New designs are becoming lighter and tubeless is becoming increasingly popular on gravel, making the switch to 700c wheels inevitable. Early adopters include Canadian veteran racing driver and self-proclaimed gearhead Geoff Kabush, who has used it successfully at several gravel events.

When gravel looks like this, insoles look like a good idea.

What’s the benefit for gravel?

The most obvious – but not limited – benefit of the insert is protection against flat tires. Relatively small volume tires are still used in gravel riding, and a failed root or invisible loose rock can quickly deflate a fun ride.

How do deposits protect against flats? By providing a cushion of soft material between the tire or the ground and the rim. Hit something too hard and the tire will compress into the foam instead of directly touching the rim. This protects the rim from damage. It also protects the tire from entrapment and, to a lesser extent, from being punctured by more pointed stones. Glass, nails, and any other object that cuts into the tire instead of stabbing the tire are, of course, still a problem. As well as side wall panels from sharp rocks. So the benefit of stakes depends in part on where you drive regularly.

The second benefit is an offshoot of the first. Because you have less to worry about about flat tires, you can safely drive with lower tire pressures. This ensures better grip and rolling resistance on often loose and rough surfaces. It also means there is less surface rattle coming through the bars, which increases comfort and reduces fatigue.

Depending on the design, tire inserts can offer more sidewall support even at lower pressures. Some inserts, like CushCore, physically press against the side of the tire. This provides support for the sidewalls so you can still corner hard at low pressure while the tire tread better conforms to and grips the surface.

Most designs also help to some extent to keep tubeless tires in place as they physically press the tire bead against the rim. Burp less tires, burp more!

Even if you lose all air pressure, you can still ride on a plane for most missions.

What about cyclocross?

Tire inserts are arguably even more useful for cyclocross. There are certainly fewer stones waiting to dent a rim than there are on gravel bikes. But the extremely low tire pressure for cyclocross and the almost no traction in the mud are ideal for the world of cross racing. Especially when the traditional alternative is a tubular, which can cost well over $ 150.00 per tire.

Tubular tires are popular in cross-country sports because they let you ride low pressures with less risk of flattening. A low tire pressure in turn ensures that the treads adapt to the ground and grip it in slippery conditions. Some professional racers drive tire pressures below 20 psi, even into the mid-teens. This is as good as impossible with a tube and tire. It’s more practical with tubeless tires, but, and especially for those of us who are heavier or less sensitive on the bike than a pro, tubeless on its own can start burping or slipping off at extremely low pressures. As with gravel, inserts provide sidewall support to keep the tire on the seat when the pressure drops. Some designs even let you drive them on a flat tire, although they usually recommend driving slower or more carefully. It should be enough, however, to pit you in a racing situation and ride better than on the rim.

While the added weight of tire inserts might put off top pros (who also won’t have to pay to replace the tubes that have flattened them), for the rest of us an option is to get the performance benefits versus barrel tubes at a lower price Price offers than tubes.

What are the weaknesses?

Of course, tire inserts have some disadvantages. Whether they outweigh the benefits depends on how you drive and, to some extent, where you drive.

The first and most obvious disadvantage is weight. Adding inserts means adding more weight to your rim. Mountain bikers can often compensate for this with lighter tire casings, but the difference in weight between the casings on gravel and cyclocross tires is less than that of mountain bikes.

There is an additional step to install and remove. The lighter weight of material for narrower tires usually means this process is easier than some mountain bike insert designs, but it may require a bit of engineering.

Lastly, most insert designs don’t protect much from cuts on the sidewall. As with the tubeless run, a sizeable sidewall cut can force you to put in a tube. The difference is that depending on where you are, you’ll have to take the insert out and carry it around before you can insert a hose. This happened to me at a cross race this fall, where a sidewall cut left me flat about 15 minutes before the start. It was a scramble, but I was still able to remove the inserts, drop in a tube and rush to the start with a single tire lever.

Categories
News

Are tire inserts the future in gravel driving?

Tire inserts are steadily gaining followers in mountain biking, and as they become more widespread, brands are starting to offer insoles specifically for gravel and cyclocross. What are tire inserts and why are they needed for thin tires? What can you do that more tire volume cannot? Well there are a couple of advantages.

Camping site installation of a Tannus mountain bike insert during the drier months

What are tire inserts?

Let’s start with the first question. What are tire inserts? There are several very different designs, but they all share the same basic idea. Something solid that will fit in a tire, usually tubeless tires instead of just air. Inserts can help protect the rim and protect the tire casing itself.

Where did the idea come from? Mountain bikers have adopted and adapted the idea of ​​off-road motorcycles. With the Moto, a solid rubber foam insert – known as a “mousse” or “bib mousse” – fills the entire inside of the tire instead of air.

With bicycles, there are a few factors that make airless options impractical. First, riders have to propel their own motion, making the weight of a solid insert an obvious disadvantage. Bicycles also use a wide range of tire pressures that must change based on conditions. Instead of a solid liner, most bike options use some type of partial liner combined with air and usually tubeless tire sealant. Inserts vary widely in design, and this is where things get interesting. Each design has its own advantages and disadvantages.

The idea first found its feet in mountain biking, where tubeless tires are widespread and weight is less important. New designs are becoming lighter and tubeless is becoming increasingly popular on gravel, making the switch to 700c wheels inevitable. Early adopters include Canadian veteran racing driver and self-proclaimed gearhead Geoff Kabush, who has used it successfully at several gravel events.

When gravel looks like this, insoles look like a good idea.

What’s the benefit for gravel?

The most obvious – but not limited – benefit of the insert is protection against flat tires. Relatively small volume tires are still used in gravel riding, and a failed root or invisible loose rock can quickly deflate a fun ride.

How do deposits protect against flats? By providing a cushion of soft material between the tire or the ground and the rim. Hit something too hard and the tire will compress into the foam instead of directly touching the rim. This protects the rim from damage. It also protects the tire from entrapment and, to a lesser extent, from being punctured by more pointed stones. Glass, nails, and any other object that cuts into the tire instead of stabbing the tire are, of course, still a problem. As well as side wall panels from sharp rocks. So the benefit of stakes depends in part on where you drive regularly.

The second benefit is an offshoot of the first. Because you have less to worry about about flat tires, you can safely drive with lower tire pressures. This ensures better grip and rolling resistance on often loose and rough surfaces. It also means there is less surface rattle coming through the bars, which increases comfort and reduces fatigue.

Depending on the design, tire inserts can offer more sidewall support even at lower pressures. Some inserts, like CushCore, physically press against the side of the tire. This provides support for the sidewalls so you can still corner hard at low pressure while the tire tread better conforms to and grips the surface.

Most designs also help to some extent to keep tubeless tires in place as they physically press the tire bead against the rim. Burp less tires, burp more!

Even if you lose all air pressure, you can still ride on a plane for most missions.

What about cyclocross?

Tire inserts are arguably even more useful for cyclocross. There are certainly fewer stones waiting to dent a rim than there are on gravel bikes. But the extremely low tire pressure for cyclocross and the almost no traction in the mud are ideal for the world of cross racing. Especially when the traditional alternative is a tubular, which can cost well over $ 150.00 per tire.

Tubular tires are popular in cross-country sports because they let you ride low pressures with less risk of flattening. A low tire pressure in turn ensures that the treads adapt to the ground and grip it in slippery conditions. Some professional racers drive tire pressures below 20 psi, even into the mid-teens. This is as good as impossible with a tube and tire. It’s more practical with tubeless tires, but, and especially for those of us who are heavier or less sensitive on the bike than a pro, tubeless on its own can start burping or slipping off at extremely low pressures. As with gravel, inserts provide sidewall support to keep the tire on the seat when the pressure drops. Some designs even let you drive them on a flat tire, although they usually recommend driving slower or more carefully. It should be enough, however, to pit you in a racing situation and ride better than on the rim.

While the added weight of tire inserts might put off top pros (who also won’t have to pay to replace the tubes that have flattened them), for the rest of us an option is to get the performance benefits versus barrel tubes at a lower price Price offers than tubes.

What are the weaknesses?

Of course, tire inserts have some disadvantages. Whether they outweigh the benefits depends on how you drive and, to some extent, where you drive.

The first and most obvious disadvantage is weight. Adding inserts means adding more weight to your rim. Mountain bikers can often compensate for this with lighter tire casings, but the difference in weight between the casings on gravel and cyclocross tires is less than that of mountain bikes.

There is an additional step to install and remove. The lighter weight of material for narrower tires usually means this process is easier than some mountain bike insert designs, but it may require a bit of engineering.

Lastly, most insert designs don’t protect much from cuts on the sidewall. As with the tubeless run, a sizeable sidewall cut can force you to put in a tube. The difference is that depending on where you are, you’ll have to take the insert out and carry it around before you can insert a hose. This happened to me at a cross race this fall, where a sidewall cut left me flat about 15 minutes before the start. It was a scramble, but I was still able to remove the inserts, drop in a tube and rush to the start with a single tire lever.

Categories
Uncategorized

Yamaha presents rally-ready prototypes of the Ténéré 700 at EICMA

If you like your Ténéré 700 served with a large helping of off-road adventure, you will love the new prototype that Yamaha has just unveiled.

The Japanese manufacturer is taking advantage of the hype surrounding the EICMA 2021 motorcycle fair in Milan and gave us a glimpse into a rally-ready Ténéré 700 prototype called Raid, which looks fantastic.

So what is it about?

Ténéré 700 Raid Prototype Unveiled

Tenere 700 prototype

One thing is clear, Yamaha designed this prototype to compete and win desert rallies, with the teaser that it will soon be “racing for the next horizon”.

To make that dream come true, the brand apparently took pretty much its entire catalog of additional performance parts and created a beast.

The lock was up Updatedwhich increases the suspension travel by 60 mm at both ends (270 mm at the front and 260 mm at the rear).

To brave the searing desert heat, there’s a new oversized cooler, oil cooler, airbox, and filter. There is also an aftermarket Akrapovic exhaust system.

A new, more aggressive look

And of course the new rally look.

We’re big fans of the mean custom paint job, but there is also a front and rear dual fuel tank that gives the Ténéré 700 a beefier look, alongside a bench seat, rally screen and even a road book setup above the handlebars.

This is a bike that means business and more.

It is not yet known if a version of the raid prototype will ever be released Showrooms for the public to buy, but we can’t wait to see it in action at rally racing in the near future.

See the Ténéré 700 prototype in action below:

Do you like to travel on two wheels? Then you will love the ABR calendar 2022

The Adventure Bike Rider Calendar 2022 is packed with 12 months of breathtaking motorcycle travel photography that is guaranteed to unleash your inner wanderlust.

This is your chance to hang the best adventure bike photography imaginable on your wall for only £ 9.99 with FREE UK delivery! Order today here.

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2022 Benelli TRK 800 first look [12 Fast Facts: New ADV Motorcycle]

We were impressed with that Benelli TRK502 and TRK502X Adventure / Sport / Touring bikes that we tested this year. The two brothers had good performance and handling. However, they were also heavy and apparently overbuilt, so we wanted a larger engine in a heavy chassis. Benelli is going one better for 2022. The brand new 2022 Benelli TRK 800 has a bigger engine and fresh chassis with improved hardware. While it’s not yet confirmed for the United States, that doesn’t stop us from taking a closer look at this fascinating motorcycle.

2022 Benelli TRK 800 price

  1. Benelli motorcycles are built in Pesaro, Italy, as they have been for 110 years. The kicker is that the resulting motorcycles are made by. be built Qianjiang motorcycle in Wenling on the Chinese Pacific coast, which Benelli owns and builds the engines. In turn, Qianjiang Motorcycle is owned by Geely, which also owns several automobile brands including Volvo, Lotus and Smart. Geely’s annual sales are nearly $ 15 billion. International finance is fascinating.
  1. The 754cc engine on the 2022 Benelli TRK 800 is completely new, although it has a familiar configuration. Benelli opted for a short-stroke design for the DOHC twin – the stroke is shorter than that of the 502 engines. The 75-horsepower peak comes in at 8500 RPM, with a maximum torque of 49 ft-lbs at 6500 RPM. A pair of 43mm throttle bodies power the liquid-cooled cylinders.
  1. The six-speed gearbox is coupled with a clutch with assist and slipper functions. All that’s missing is a quickshifter.

2022 Benelli TRK 800 RRP

  1. The steel lattice frame uses an aluminum swing arm. The chassis has a spacious 60+ inch wheelbase, although we don’t have rake and trail numbers. The seat height of 32.8 inches corresponds to that of a Honda CB500X, making the TRK 800 accessible to a wide range of riders. However, it is still on the heavy side and weighs roughly the same as the BMW R 1250 GS.
  1. The Marzocchi fork is an example of the beefy nature of the TRK 800. We liked the action and feel of the TRK502s 50mm fork, but not the weight. The 502 fork is non-adjustable, while the 800 is fully adjustable and named Marzocchi. The damper is self-supporting – no linkage – and the rebound damping and spring preload can be adjusted. The travel is a moderate 6.7 inches at both ends.
  1. Pirelli Scorpion Rally STR tires signal that the 2022 Benelli TRK 800 has a legitimate interest in straying from the pavement. The wheels are wire spokes with aluminum rims, in an ADV standard 19/17 inch tire combination.

2022 Benelli TRK 800 for sale

  1. Braking is serious, with radially mounted Brembo calipers and 320mm discs up front. The rear end also gets the Brembo treatment, along with a 260mm washer. ABS is standard; We don’t have any details on the off-road ABS modes.
  1. The fuel tank holds nearly six gallons, and the 2022 Benelli TRK 800 is rated for over 50 mpg. In true adventure style, the 300 mile range knocks on the door between refueling sessions.
  1. A seven-inch TFT dash greets the driver.

2022 Benelli TRK 800 specifications

  1. With the LED lighting giving the designers some freedom, the Italian styling is fantastic. The Chinese engine is optically the weak link, so it is blackened and remains inconspicuous to the colorful plastic and the rims. The finish on the TRK 800 looks amazing in the photos, but we need to reserve final judgment until we see one in person.
  1. Accessory side cases and a top case are available and fulfill the promise of the TRK 800 as an adventure tourer.
  1. The 2022 Benelli TRK 800 will only be seen in showrooms around the world in the second half of 2022. We hope that SSR Motorsports, the Benelli importer in the United States, will bring the TRK 800 as soon as possible.

2022 Benelli TRK 800 specifications

ENGINE

  • Type: parallel twin
  • Displacement: 754cc
  • Bore x stroke: 88 x 62 mm
  • Maximum power: 75 hp at 8500 rpm
  • Maximum torque: 49 ft-lbs @ 6500 rpm
  • Compression ratio: 11.5: 1
  • Valve train: DOHC; 4 vpc
  • Refueling: EFI with two 43mm throttle bodies
  • Lubrication: wet sump
  • Transmission: 6-speed with auxiliary and slipper functions
  • Final drive: chain

CHASSIS

  • Frame: steel grille with aluminum swing arm
  • Front Suspension: Fully Adjustable Marzocchi 50mm Inverted Fork; 6.7 in
  • Rear suspension: Cantilevered rebound damping and spring preload adjustable dampers; 6.7 in
  • Wheels: wire spokes with aluminum rims
  • Front wheel: 19 x 3.00
  • Rear wheel: 17 x 4.25
  • Tires: Pirelli Scorpion Rally STR
  • Front tire: 110/80 x 19
  • Rear tire: 150/70 x 17
  • Front brakes: semi-floating 320 mm discs with radially mounted Brembo 4-piston monobloc brake calipers
  • Rear brake: 260 mm disc with Brembo single-piston caliper
  • ABS: standard

DIMENSIONS and CAPACITIES

  • Wheelbase: 60.2 inches
  • Seat height: 32.8 inches
  • Ground clearance: 8.3 inches
  • Tank capacity: 5.8 gallons
  • Estimated fuel economy: 51 mpg
  • Empty weight: 550 pounds (approx)

2022 Benelli TRK 800 Price: RRP TBA

2022 Benelli TRK 800 Photo Gallery

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Adventure Travel on a Budget: Five Tips for Traveling Like a Boss

Your soul is ready to ride the world but your bank account wants to be different? It happens more often than you think – but don’t despair. Adventure travel doesn’t have to be an expensive endeavor as long as you are willing to compromise (a little) and plan ahead (a lot). And no, adventure travel on a budget doesn’t mean sleeping in trenches and surviving on pot noodles – it just means a smarter way to travel the world.

February 6, 29

1. Set your priorities

What comfort do you need? You can buy a $ 20,000 bike and ride around for a month, or you can buy a $ 5,000 bike and ride around the world for a year. It’s about the level of luxury you need. Are you in desperate need of a big, comfortable bike, good restaurant meals, and decent hotels? Prepare to spend $ 100 and more a day. Are you satisfied with a smaller, perhaps used, bicycle, a simpler place to stay and occasionally cook for yourself? Your spending could drop to $ 50 or less a day.

Be honest with yourself and manage your expectations. Are you going on a fancy vacation or an adventure trip? These two things don’t have to be mutually exclusive, just consider whether you want to invest in things or in happiness and freedom.

S 2018 6 20 89

2. Get creative

As mentioned above, compromises are important, but that doesn’t mean you have to sleep under a tarpaulin and eat canned tuna all the time. There are ways to make adventure travel exciting and comfortable without depriving yourself.

• To deceive – Do you miss a stay in a nice hotel? See if you can request a discount or a free stay in exchange for great photos or a website upgrade for the owner, for example.

• DIY – Do you want a good steak for dinner? Instead of indulging yourself in a restaurant, buy a nice piece of filet mignon from a local butcher and cook it yourself. This cuts costs a lot, but you still have a fantastic dinner!

• Break – Life on the road can be stressful at times – so plan a little break every now and then. Stay in a peaceful jungle lodge and read up, or grab an AirBnB in a lovely town and go for a drink if that’s your thing. Stopping every now and then and doing things you missed while traveling can boost morale and finances tremendously because the slower you travel, the less you spend.

L 2018 7 18 21 237

3. Travel slowly

Speaking of decelerating: it is usually wiser to choose a country, region or continent and explore it slowly than to race around the world. When you travel slowly, you spend less on gas and accommodation, see more, and have a much deeper experience of the places you travel through.

Adventure travel isn’t just about riding a motorcycle – it’s also about immersing yourself in local cultures and experiencing the world on a very human level. So hold on to your horses, spend less and see more!

20180406 114324 2

4. Cheat currencies

If your budget is tight, think about where you are going. North America, Europe, Australia and New Zealand will be very expensive to travel. So if you can’t afford it already, go to Asia or South America instead (Africa is on the list too, but the very cost of paperwork – Visa and Carnet de Passage – could be more expensive).

However, if you plan to reach all six continents, see if you can take advantage of currencies. Indulge in good hotels, restaurants, and activities in places like Bolivia, Tajikistan, and Laos, but consider camping and cooking your own food in Norway and Canada as often as possible.

DSCF1299 2

5. Be prepared

We make irrational decisions when we are under stress or compulsion – so plan ahead to avoid this as much as possible.

When you have great riding and camping gear, rather than giving in to bad weather and checking into hotels, go camping. If your bike is well maintained, the less likely you’ll be stuck somewhere and spend a fortune on DHL services to get you parts. Find out about political situations and borders in advance: Thousands of kilometers of detours due to unrest or buying an expensive Carnet de Passage or a guided tour at the last minute can quickly become very expensive. Sure, you can’t be prepared for everything and unexpected things happen – but being aware and having a plan B just in case can save you a lot of headaches and costs.

So what’s the bottom line? Adventure travel is possible for as little as $ 15 a day and as much as … well, I guess there is no limit to how much you can spend if you want and can! The point is, a little creativity, compromise, and slow travel can be big factors in your budget decisions. So do your research, decide where you want to go and what you’re comfortable with, and get going!

Categories
Uncategorized

Yamaha presents rally-ready prototypes of the Ténéré 700 at EICMA

If you like your Ténéré 700 served with a large helping of off-road adventure, you will love the new prototype that Yamaha has just unveiled.

The Japanese manufacturer is taking advantage of the hype surrounding the EICMA 2021 motorcycle fair in Milan and gave us a glimpse into a rally-ready Ténéré 700 prototype called Raid, which looks fantastic.

So what is it about?

Ténéré 700 Raid Prototype Unveiled

Tenere 700 prototype

One thing is clear, Yamaha designed this prototype to compete and win desert rallies, with the teaser that it will soon be “racing for the next horizon”.

To make that dream come true, the brand apparently took pretty much its entire catalog of additional performance parts and created a beast.

The lock was up Updatedwhich increases the suspension travel by 60 mm at both ends (270 mm at the front and 260 mm at the rear).

To brave the searing desert heat, there’s a new oversized cooler, oil cooler, airbox, and filter. There is also an aftermarket Akrapovic exhaust system.

A new, more aggressive look

And of course the new rally look.

We’re big fans of the mean custom paint job, but there is also a front and rear dual fuel tank that gives the Ténéré 700 a beefier look, alongside a bench seat, rally screen and even a road book setup above the handlebars.

This is a bike that means business and more.

It is not yet known if a version of the raid prototype will ever be released Showrooms for the public to buy, but we can’t wait to see it in action at rally races in the near future.

See the Ténéré 700 prototype in action below:

Do you like to travel on two wheels? Then you will love the ABR calendar 2022

The Adventure Bike Rider Calendar 2022 is packed with 12 months of breathtaking motorcycle travel photography that is guaranteed to unleash your inner wanderlust.

This is your chance to hang the best adventure bike photography imaginable on your wall for only £ 9.99 with FREE UK delivery! Order today here.

Categories
News

Are tire inserts the future in gravel driving?

Tire inserts are steadily gaining followers in mountain biking, and as they become more widespread, brands are starting to offer insoles specifically for gravel and cyclocross. What are tire inserts and why are they needed for thin tires? What can you do that more tire volume cannot? Well there are a couple of advantages.

Camping site installation of a Tannus mountain bike insert during the drier months

What are tire inserts?

Let’s start with the first question. What are tire inserts? There are several very different designs, but they all share the same basic idea. Something solid that will fit in a tire, usually tubeless tires instead of just air. Inserts can help protect the rim and protect the tire casing itself.

Where did the idea come from? Mountain bikers have adopted and adapted the idea of ​​off-road motorcycles. With the Moto, a solid rubber foam insert – known as a “mousse” or “bib mousse” – fills the entire inside of the tire instead of air.

With bicycles, there are a few factors that make airless options impractical. First, riders have to propel their own motion, making the weight of a solid insert an obvious disadvantage. Bicycles also use a wide range of tire pressures that must change based on conditions. Instead of a solid liner, most bike options use some type of partial liner combined with air and usually tubeless tire sealant. Inserts vary widely in design, and this is where things get interesting. Each design has its own advantages and disadvantages.

The idea first found its feet in mountain biking, where tubeless tires are widespread and weight is less important. New designs are becoming lighter and tubeless is becoming increasingly popular on gravel, making the switch to 700c wheels inevitable. Early adopters include Canadian veteran racing driver and self-proclaimed gearhead Geoff Kabush, who has used it successfully at several gravel events.

When gravel looks like this, insoles look like a good idea.

What’s the benefit for gravel?

The most obvious – but not limited – benefit of the insert is protection against flat tires. Relatively small volume tires are still used in gravel riding, and a failed root or invisible loose rock can quickly deflate a fun ride.

How do deposits protect against flats? By providing a cushion of soft material between the tire or the ground and the rim. Hit something too hard and the tire will compress into the foam instead of directly touching the rim. This protects the rim from damage. It also protects the tire from entrapment and, to a lesser extent, from being punctured by more pointed stones. Glass, nails, and any other object that cuts into the tire instead of stabbing the tire are, of course, still a problem. As well as side wall panels from sharp rocks. So the benefit of stakes depends in part on where you drive regularly.

The second benefit is an offshoot of the first. Because you have less to worry about about flat tires, you can safely drive with lower tire pressures. This ensures better grip and rolling resistance on often loose and rough surfaces. It also means there is less surface rattle coming through the bars, which increases comfort and reduces fatigue.

Depending on the design, tire inserts can offer more sidewall support even at lower pressures. Some inserts, like CushCore, physically press against the side of the tire. This provides support for the sidewalls so you can still corner hard at low pressure while the tire tread better conforms to and grips the surface.

Most designs also help to some extent to keep tubeless tires in place as they physically press the tire bead against the rim. Burp less tires, burp more!

Even if you lose all air pressure, you can still ride on a plane for most missions.

What about cyclocross?

Tire inserts are arguably even more useful for cyclocross. There are certainly fewer stones waiting to dent a rim than there are on gravel bikes. But the extremely low tire pressure for cyclocross and the almost no traction in the mud are ideal for the world of cross racing. Especially when the traditional alternative is a tubular, which can cost well over $ 150.00 per tire.

Tubular tires are popular in cross-country sports because they let you ride low pressures with less risk of flattening. A low tire pressure in turn ensures that the treads adapt to the ground and grip it in slippery conditions. Some professional racers drive tire pressures below 20 psi, even into the mid-teens. This is as good as impossible with a tube and tire. It’s more practical with tubeless tires, but, and especially for those of us who are heavier or less sensitive on the bike than a pro, tubeless on its own can start burping or slipping off at extremely low pressures. As with gravel, inserts provide sidewall support to keep the tire on the seat when the pressure drops. Some designs even let you drive them on a flat tire, although they usually recommend driving slower or more carefully. It should be enough, however, to pit you in a racing situation and ride better than on the rim.

While the added weight of tire inserts might put off top pros (who also won’t have to pay to replace the tubes that have flattened them), for the rest of us an option is to get the performance benefits versus barrel tubes at a lower price Price offers than tubes.

What are the weaknesses?

Of course, tire inserts have some disadvantages. Whether they outweigh the benefits depends on how you drive and, to some extent, where you drive.

The first and most obvious disadvantage is weight. Adding inserts means adding more weight to your rim. Mountain bikers can often compensate for this with lighter tire casings, but the difference in weight between the casings on gravel and cyclocross tires is less than that of mountain bikes.

There is an additional step to install and remove. The lighter weight of material for narrower tires usually means this process is easier than some mountain bike insert designs, but it may require a bit of engineering.

Lastly, most insert designs don’t protect much from cuts on the sidewall. As with the tubeless run, a sizeable sidewall cut can force you to put in a tube. The difference is that depending on where you are, you’ll have to take the insert out and carry it around before you can insert a hose. This happened to me at a cross race this fall, where a sidewall cut left me flat about 15 minutes before the start. It was a scramble, but I was still able to remove the inserts, drop in a tube and rush to the start with a single tire lever.

Categories
News

Are tire inserts the future in gravel driving?

Tire inserts are steadily gaining followers in mountain biking, and as they become more widespread, brands are starting to offer insoles specifically for gravel and cyclocross. What are tire inserts and why are they needed for thin tires? What can you do that more tire volume cannot? Well there are a couple of advantages.

Camping site installation of a Tannus mountain bike insert during the drier months

What are tire inserts?

Let’s start with the first question. What are tire inserts? There are several very different designs, but they all share the same basic idea. Something solid that will fit in a tire, usually tubeless tires instead of just air. Inserts can help protect the rim and protect the tire casing itself.

Where did the idea come from? Mountain bikers have adopted and adapted the idea of ​​off-road motorcycles. With the Moto, a solid rubber foam insert – known as a “mousse” or “bib mousse” – fills the entire inside of the tire instead of air.

With bicycles, there are a few factors that make airless options impractical. First, riders have to propel their own motion, making the weight of a solid insert an obvious disadvantage. Bicycles also use a wide range of tire pressures that must change based on conditions. Instead of a solid liner, most bike options use some type of partial liner combined with air and usually tubeless tire sealant. Inserts vary widely in design, and this is where things get interesting. Each design has its own advantages and disadvantages.

The idea first found its feet in mountain biking, where tubeless tires are widespread and weight is less important. New designs are becoming lighter and tubeless is becoming increasingly popular on gravel, making the switch to 700c wheels inevitable. Early adopters include Canadian veteran racing driver and self-proclaimed gearhead Geoff Kabush, who has used it successfully at several gravel events.

When gravel looks like this, insoles look like a good idea.

What’s the benefit for gravel?

The most obvious – but not limited – benefit of the insert is protection against flat tires. Relatively small volume tires are still used in gravel riding, and a failed root or invisible loose rock can quickly deflate a fun ride.

How do deposits protect against flats? By providing a cushion of soft material between the tire or the ground and the rim. Hit something too hard and the tire will compress into the foam instead of directly touching the rim. This protects the rim from damage. It also protects the tire from entrapment and, to a lesser extent, from being punctured by more pointed stones. Glass, nails, and any other object that cuts into the tire instead of stabbing the tire are, of course, still a problem. As well as side wall panels from sharp rocks. So the benefit of stakes depends in part on where you drive regularly.

The second benefit is an offshoot of the first. Because you have less to worry about about flat tires, you can safely drive with lower tire pressures. This ensures better grip and rolling resistance on often loose and rough surfaces. It also means there is less surface rattle coming through the bars, which increases comfort and reduces fatigue.

Depending on the design, tire inserts can offer more sidewall support even at lower pressures. Some inserts, like CushCore, physically press against the side of the tire. This provides support for the sidewalls so you can still corner hard at low pressure while the tire tread better conforms to and grips the surface.

Most designs also help to some extent to keep tubeless tires in place as they physically press the tire bead against the rim. Burp less tires, burp more!

Even if you lose all air pressure, you can still ride on a plane for most missions.

What about cyclocross?

Tire inserts are arguably even more useful for cyclocross. There are certainly fewer stones waiting to dent a rim than there are on gravel bikes. But the extremely low tire pressure for cyclocross and the almost no traction in the mud are ideal for the world of cross racing. Especially when the traditional alternative is a tubular, which can cost well over $ 150.00 per tire.

Tubular tires are popular in cross-country sports because they let you ride low pressures with less risk of flattening. A low tire pressure in turn ensures that the treads adapt to the ground and grip it in slippery conditions. Some professional racers drive tire pressures below 20 psi, even into the mid-teens. This is as good as impossible with a tube and tire. It’s more practical with tubeless tires, but, and especially for those of us who are heavier or less sensitive on the bike than a pro, tubeless on its own can start burping or slipping off at extremely low pressures. As with gravel, inserts provide sidewall support to keep the tire on the seat when the pressure drops. Some designs even let you drive them on a flat tire, although they usually recommend driving slower or more carefully. It should be enough, however, to pit you in a racing situation and ride better than on the rim.

While the added weight of tire inserts might put off top pros (who also won’t have to pay to replace the tubes that have flattened them), for the rest of us an option is to get the performance benefits versus barrel tubes at a lower price Price offers than tubes.

What are the weaknesses?

Of course, tire inserts have some disadvantages. Whether they outweigh the benefits depends on how you drive and, to some extent, where you drive.

The first and most obvious disadvantage is weight. Adding inserts means adding more weight to your rim. Mountain bikers can often compensate for this with lighter tire casings, but the difference in weight between the casings on gravel and cyclocross tires is less than that of mountain bikes.

There is an additional step to install and remove. The lighter weight of material for narrower tires usually means this process is easier than some mountain bike insert designs, but it may require a bit of engineering.

Lastly, most insert designs don’t protect much from cuts on the sidewall. As with the tubeless run, a sizeable sidewall cut can force you to put in a tube. The difference is that depending on where you are, you’ll have to take the insert out and carry it around before you can insert a hose. This happened to me at a cross race this fall, where a sidewall cut left me flat about 15 minutes before the start. It was a scramble, but I was still able to remove the inserts, drop in a tube and rush to the start with a single tire lever.

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Royal Enfield is upgrading the Himalayan 2019 with ABS and a new color – “Sleet”.

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Royal Enfield improves the Himalayan for 2019 with ABS and a new range of colors – “Sleet”.

The popular Adventure Touring model, which was introduced in North America last year, now comes standard with ABS and a new, limited availability color Sleet. Dealers in the US and Canada have the new 2019 Himalayan available in the showrooms from April.

RoyalEnfiled Himalayan ABS slate NEW LEAD Bodypic

the Himalayan Motorrad made a strong debut in North America last year. The ABS upgrade and new color come right on time for the start of the riding season and an ongoing craze for the brand’s first adventure motorcycle.

RoyalEnfiled Himalayan ABS slate 4

The colors Snow and Granite will continue to be available in 2019, while the new color Sleet has limited availability.

RoyalEnfiled Himalayan ABS slate 3

Prices for 2019 Himalayan with ABS at MSRP: $ 4749.

All models in Royal Enfields current lineup 2019 now has standard ABS:

Classic 500 Military – Battle Green, Desert Storm, and Squadron Blue – $ 5,699
Classic Standard – Black and Lagoon – $ 5,599
Classic chrome – black, green, and graphite – $ 5,799
Classic Gun Metal Gray – $ 5,699
Classic Stealth $ 5,799

RoyalEnfiled Himalayan ABS slate 2

Above Royal Enfield

The oldest motorcycle company in the world in continuous production, Royal Enfield built his first motorcycle in 1901. A division of Eicher Motors Limited, Royal Enfield has created the mid-size motorcycle segment in India with its unique and distinctive modern classic motorcycles. With its manufacturing base in Chennai, India, Royal Enfield was able to rapidly increase production against the increasing demand for its motorcycles. Royal Enfield is a leading player in the global mid-weight motorcycle market.

And be sure to stop by ours ADVMoto Instagram and watch our team unpack a new one Royal EnfHimalaya fieldn in “glacier”.

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2022 Benelli TRK 800 first look [12 Fast Facts: New ADV Motorcycle]

We were impressed with that Benelli TRK502 and TRK502X Adventure / Sport / Touring bikes that we tested this year. The two brothers had good performance and handling. However, they were also heavy and apparently overbuilt, so we wanted a larger engine in a heavy chassis. For 2022, Benelli is making one step better. The brand new 2022 Benelli TRK 800 has a bigger engine and fresh chassis with improved hardware. While it’s not yet confirmed for the United States, that doesn’t stop us from taking a closer look at this fascinating motorcycle.

2022 Benelli TRK 800 price

  1. Benelli motorcycles are built in Pesaro, Italy, as they have been for 110 years. The kicker is that the resulting motorcycles are made by. be built Qianjiang motorcycle in Wenling on the Chinese Pacific coast, which Benelli owns and builds the engines. In turn, Qianjiang Motorcycle is owned by Geely, which also owns several automobile brands including Volvo, Lotus and Smart. Geely’s annual sales are nearly $ 15 billion. International finance is fascinating.
  1. The 754cc engine on the 2022 Benelli TRK 800 is completely new, although it has a familiar configuration. Benelli opted for a short-stroke design for the DOHC twin – the stroke is shorter than that of the 502 engines. The 75-horsepower peak comes in at 8500 RPM, with a maximum torque of 49 ft-lbs at 6500 RPM. A pair of 43mm throttle bodies power the liquid-cooled cylinders.
  1. The six-speed gearbox is coupled with a clutch with assist and slipper functions. All that’s missing is a quickshifter.

2022 Benelli TRK 800 RRP

  1. The steel lattice frame uses an aluminum swing arm. The chassis has a spacious 60+ inch wheelbase, although we don’t have rake and trail numbers. The seat height of 32.8 inches corresponds to that of a Honda CB500X, making the TRK 800 accessible to a wide range of riders. However, it is still on the heavy side and weighs roughly the same as the BMW R 1250 GS.
  1. The Marzocchi fork is an example of the beefy nature of the TRK 800. We liked the action and feel of the TRK502s 50mm fork, but not the weight. The 502 fork is non-adjustable, while the 800 is fully adjustable and named Marzocchi. The damper is self-supporting – no linkage – and the rebound damping and spring preload can be adjusted. The travel is a moderate 6.7 inches at both ends.
  1. Pirelli Scorpion Rally STR tires signal that the 2022 Benelli TRK 800 has a legitimate interest in straying from the sidewalk. The wheels are wire spokes with aluminum rims, in an ADV standard 19/17 inch tire combination.

2022 Benelli TRK 800 for sale

  1. Braking is serious, with radially mounted Brembo calipers and 320mm discs up front. The rear end also gets the Brembo treatment, along with a 260mm washer. ABS is standard; We don’t have any details on the off-road ABS modes.
  1. The fuel tank holds nearly six gallons, and the 2022 Benelli TRK 800 is rated for over 50 mpg. In true adventure style, the 300 mile range knocks on the door between refueling sessions.
  1. A seven-inch TFT dash greets the driver.

2022 Benelli TRK 800 specifications

  1. With the LED lighting giving the designers some freedom, the Italian styling is fantastic. The Chinese engine is optically the weak link, so it is blackened and remains inconspicuous to the colorful plastic and the rims. The finish on the TRK 800 looks amazing in the photos, but we need to reserve final judgment until we see one in person.
  1. Accessory side cases and a top case are available and fulfill the promise of the TRK 800 as an adventure tourer.
  1. The 2022 Benelli TRK 800 will only be seen in showrooms around the world in the second half of 2022. We hope that SSR Motorsports, the Benelli importer in the United States, will bring the TRK 800 as soon as possible.

2022 Benelli TRK 800 specifications

ENGINE

  • Type: parallel twin
  • Displacement: 754cc
  • Bore x stroke: 88 x 62 mm
  • Maximum power: 75 hp at 8500 rpm
  • Maximum torque: 49 ft-lbs @ 6500 rpm
  • Compression ratio: 11.5: 1
  • Valve train: DOHC; 4 vpc
  • Refueling: EFI with two 43mm throttle bodies
  • Lubrication: wet sump
  • Transmission: 6-speed with auxiliary and slipper functions
  • Final drive: chain

CHASSIS

  • Frame: steel grille with aluminum swing arm
  • Front Suspension: Fully Adjustable Marzocchi 50mm Inverted Fork; 6.7 in
  • Rear suspension: Cantilevered rebound damping and spring preload adjustable dampers; 6.7 in
  • Wheels: wire spokes with aluminum rims
  • Front wheel: 19 x 3.00
  • Rear wheel: 17 x 4.25
  • Tires: Pirelli Scorpion Rally STR
  • Front tire: 110/80 x 19
  • Rear tire: 150/70 x 17
  • Front brakes: semi-floating 320 mm discs with radially mounted Brembo 4-piston monobloc brake calipers
  • Rear brake: 260 mm disc with Brembo single-piston caliper
  • ABS: standard

DIMENSIONS and CAPACITIES

  • Wheelbase: 60.2 inches
  • Seat height: 32.8 inches
  • Ground clearance: 8.3 inches
  • Tank capacity: 5.8 gallons
  • Estimated fuel economy: 51 mpg
  • Empty weight: 550 pounds (approx)

2022 Benelli TRK 800 Price: RRP TBA

2022 Benelli TRK 800 Photo Gallery